By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

TINY people ski down a mountain made of meringues during a full moon while a group of paddy field workers get to picking hundreds of thousands of sprinkles

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Snow much fun: Tiny figurines skii down a meringue mountain during a full moon

The series of surreal scenarios are all part of the world of ‘Little People’ captured by Scottish artist David Gilliver.

Catching some rays: Little people sunbathe on a lemon during the summertime

The Glasgow-based professional photographer, 36, spends hours posing and shooting the two centimetres tall figurines among various everyday food and household products.

Don't cry over split milk: The tiny figures windsurf on a glass of split milk

The creative artist is always looking for new scenes after he began shooting the figurines ten years ago during his Fine Art degree at Glasgow School of Art.

A scuba diver gets himself stuck inside the yolk of a fried egg

Gilliver said: “I have always enjoyed using food products in my scenes, partly because I enjoy creating amusing scenes using them, but also because they help lend a real sense of scale to the figures.

“The little people fascinate me. I enjoy finding new figures frozen in a particular pose as I almost feel like I have to help them find a task to complete or be involved in, somehow helping them fulfil their purpose.

Hundreds and thousands: Tiny paddy field workers get to picking up hundreds of sprinkles

“More often than not, I place the figures in scenarios where they have a gargantuan task to complete which sometimes invokes a sense of sympathy inside of me for them.

Eggcellent: A group of 2cm tall figurines sunbathe on top of a box of eggs

"I am a hard taskmaster. Although my recent work is perhaps a little more playful than before as they seem to be enjoying themselves more."

David has used figurines in his photography as far back as 1999, during his Fine Art Photography degree at the Glasgow School of Art

The time taken to construct each scene varies depending on the complexity of each diorama.

Sticky situation: A team of forensic scientists observe a worker crushed by a lollipop

The 36-year-old artist said: “Some will take as little as 20-30 minutes to prepare and others may take up to an hour to get just right before I start photographing the scene with my macro lens.”

The photographer spends hours posing and shooting the two centimetre tall figurines among various everyday foods

“Once I have each scene set up just the way I want it, I will photograph it from a few different angles in order to ensure that I have managed to capture the scene from the most effective angle.

Gilliver admits that he enjoys placing the figurines in scenarios where they have a 'gargantuan task to complete'

"Once I’m happy with what I have captured, the editing process begins.”

The Red Sea: Two 'Little People' sit on a floating wine cork in the middle of 'The Red Sea'

The artist’s newest creations include a murder scene with a lollipop and a toxic spill using washing up liquid.

David imagines that if the Little People could speak they would probably have a lot to say about the positions he puts them in

David imagines that if the Little People could speak they would probably have a lot to say about the positions he puts them in.

Toxic spill: A group of little people are covered in washing-up liquid

“Hopefully they would thank me for allowing them to fulfil their potential in the various scenarios they find themselves placed in. Or maybe they would tell me to stop being so silly,” he added.

To see more of David’s miniature figurines, visit www.davidgilliver.com