By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

TAKE a look inside the tiny Irish island which is welcoming ‘American refugees’ fleeing Donald Trump

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Michelle McCarron spent a few days exploring the island of Inishturk capturing its rugged beauty

Photographer, Michelle McCarron, originally from Monaghan, Ireland but now based in the US, spent a few days exploring the island of Inishturk capturing its rugged beauty and natural way of life.

On the island many of the men are fishermen for crab and lobster that is exported to the restaurants of Ireland's main cities and as far away as France

With only 58 full-time residents, Inishturk, which sits nine miles off the coast of County Mayo, made headlines last year after offering refuge to Americans considering leaving the country after Donald Trump was elected President.

Only 5km by 2.5km in size, the island is rich in archaeological sites and has been inhabited on and off since 4000 BC

McCarron, a dual citizen of the United States said: “Life on Inishturk is bliss if you love nature, appreciate peace and quiet interspersed with great chat, people, the 'craic' and the sounds of the wind and the ocean.

Inishturk gained international attention in 2016 after a number of websites claimed that the island would welcome any American "refugees" fleeing Trump

“Life on Ireland's islands is very unique and there is a calmness that envelopes one as soon as you step ashore any one of them.

“With increasing tourism and people trying to escape the cities they are becoming busier, and overrun with tourism infrastructure, which can obliterate local culture.

Inishturk, which translates as ‘Island of the Wild Boar’ sits atop cliffs and steep hills that drop down to the Atlantic

"Inishturk has managed to maintain its character, its population and protect its environment.”

Staying in a B&B with a local couple, Michelle was able to live island life first hand

Inishturk, which translates as ‘Island of the Wild Boar’ sits atop cliffs and steep hills that drop down to the Atlantic.

For photographer Michelle, this was her second visit as she wanted to capture the island’s traditional way of life

Only 5km by 2.5km in size, the island is rich in archaeological sites and has been inhabited on and off since 4000 BC.

With increasing tourism and people trying to escape the cities, Inishturk is becoming busier

For photographer Michelle, this was her second visit as she wanted to capture the traditional way of life on an Irish island.

She accompanied her host and fishermen Bernard on a fishing trip

She said: “I'm interested in the places where people choose to live close to the earth, taking sustainably from the resources around them and limiting their dependance on technology as a way of life."

On the eastern side of Inishturk are the secluded Tranaun and Curran beaches, with fantastic clear blue waters

Staying in a B&B with a local couple, Michelle was able to live island life first hand as she accompanied her host Phylomena to a community meeting and spent a day fishing with host and fishermen, Bernard.

Michelle said: “Fishing is a big part of life on the island. Many of the men are fishermen for crab and lobster that is exported to the restaurants of Ireland's main cities and as far away as France. The islanders are known for their sea faring skills and their connection to the sea is very much part of their identity.

The island is home to a primary school, which in 2011 had only 3 pupils

“Inishturk people are some of the most open and genuine individuals I have ever met. As a stranger coming ashore I felt very much welcomed and the enthusiasm of the locals to show me their island was always present.”