By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

STRIKING images of remote Romanian villages show the medieval conditions in which inhabitants work, celebrate and live

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A striking portrait of a young girl celebrating a traditional festival in Romania

The insightful photographs show natives of the remote Romanian countryside driving horse and carts, tending to animals and enjoying a local traditional festival.

Tradition: At a local festival men dance with cow bells to ward off evil spirits

The pictures were taken by photographer Alex Robciuc in various villages around the Maramures County of Romania such as Bârsana, Strâmtura, and Breb.

The villages of Romania are places where horses and carts are still more useful than cars

Robciuc said: “The portraits shows people in different places, doing what they usually do; working, celebrating, thinking and hoping - like we all do.

Taken in various remote villages around the Maramures County of Romania, the photos show people going by their day to day routine

“What is particular with them is the fact that unlike most people they are not constantly around technology so they aren’t used to having their photo taken.

Certain villages in Romania live in a time warp, caught between one century and the next

“The expressions they hold in the photos are all completely natural as they do not want to appear different than they are. The face captured in the portraits shows how complex a person can be in his simplicity.”

The 100-or-so villages, scattered along the southern range of the Transylvanian Alps, date from the 12th century

The village of Breb is much loved by British monarchy and Prince Charles is known to have spent many holidays in the remote village.

Robciuc said: “When people look at my photos, I would like them to appreciate the individuals in the images for the fact that they are preserving the life almost exactly how it was many hundreds of years ago"

Alex said: “Breb is well known because Prince Charles gifted his first grandson with a land full of mountain flowers in Transylvania.”

The series of insightful images show people working, celebrating and living in the remote countryside

The 100-or-so villages are scattered along the southern range of the Carpathian Mountains and otherwise known as the Transylvanian Alps.

They date from the 12th century, and are among the last vestiges of European medieval culture.

In the Romanian villages it is not uncommon to see more horses and carts than cars on the road

Robciuc said: “When people look at my photos, I would like them to appreciate the individuals in the images for the fact that they are preserving the life almost exactly how it was many hundreds of years ago.

 

Alex ventured around various Romanian villages to capture the beautiful and simple portraits
Robciuc takes a close-up shot of a young boy dressed in traditional clothing

“It is not simple to live the way they do and we know that in our days it is simple to choose to be a modern person in every aspect of the life.

“I also want people to look at those faces and to understand that life can be lived in many ways and different conditions, and to believe that the happiness is found in us and not into the things that are around us.”