By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

A PACK of lionesses had their afternoon nap interrupted by a furious swarm of bees

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A single African bee sting is no more venomous than a European bee sting, though African honeybees respond more quickly when disturbed than do European honey bees

The queens of the jungle were reclining by a watering hole when the swarm descended and disrupted the peace.

The lions were unable to defend themselves against the bees, being too slow to bite them on the wing and getting frustrated in the heat

The series of images, captured by wildlife photographer Andrew Forsyth, show the lions unable to defend themselves against the bees, being too slow to bite them and getting frustrated in the heat.

A female lion attempts to use her paw to pat away the irritating African Bees

The African bee is known to be more aggressive than European honey bees and while their sting is no more venomous, they usually attack in greater numbers and target more frequently.

Kalahari lioness bites at a swarm of African bees at Craig Lockhart waterhole in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Andrew said: “It was like watching a contest between a lightweight and heavyweight boxer, with the lightweight just moving around scoring with little jabs that slowly wore the opponent down.”

Forsyth said: “It was like watching a contest between a lightweight and heavyweight boxer, with the lightweight just moving around scoring with little jabs that slowly wore the opponent down.”

Snapped in Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa, the Kalahari lions are relatively easy to spot with daytime temperatures in the excess of 40 degrees celsius.

A lion lays back and shields her face from being stung by a bee with her large paw

Andrew, 47, said: “Lions spend much of their daytime sleeping so for wildlife photographers most our time with lions is spent waiting for something interesting to happen."

The series of images captured by wildlife photographer Andrew Forsyth show the lions unable to defend themselves against the bees

"The intervention of the bees provided some welcome entertainment, although the lions weren’t amused.”

Two female lions have their afternoon siesta rudely interrupted by a group of African bees

During the process of photographing the animals, Andrew himself was stung by one of the bees.

Andrew said: "The bees are attracted to dark-coloured parts of the body so will target noses and mouths"

He said: “The bees came to investigate me whilst I was taking pictures one stung me right on the back. I had to take care to remove the dead bee as they release a pheromone that signals the other bees to attack.

Forsyth said: "The intervention of the bees provided some welcome entertainment, although the lions weren't amused"

“It only took a handful of these aggressive insects buzzing around the lions’ faces and inside their nostrils to ruin the siesta, they eventually decided to up-sticks and retreat to the dunes.”