By Emma Lowe @Emma_features

WITH her hair rolled into prim pin curls, and her cleavage modestly tucked away, Holly Foster is not your regular 22-year-old

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Videographer / Director: Bahareh Hosseini
Producer: Emma Lowe
Editor: Sonia Estal

In Style: Vintage queen Holly Foster encourages her peers to lengthen their skirts

Winner of this year’s Miss Vintage UK, pretty Holly prides herself on her lady-like attire.

Vintage queen Holly Foster encourages her peers to lengthen their skirts
The fashion enthusiast claims girls today are often left ‘vulnerable' because of their provocative clothing

Encouraging her peers to lengthen their skirts – the fashion enthusiast claimed girls today were often left ‘vulnerable' because of their provocative clothing.

Holly slammed the 'reckless style' of pop stars such as Rihanna and Miley Cyrus suggesting they’re excessive nudity encouraged young girls to bare too much flesh.

She said: “I think if girls dressed more demurely they would find they would be treated more as adults particularly and treated like ladies.

Fashion statement: Holly Foster poses with her friend Ciera O'Hare

“If you compare a modern day woman with a vintage 1950s lady, the difference is just that – she’s a lady.

“Girls my age will go out on the town in skimpy – largely unflattering – clothing and they are surprised when they are not treated with respect.

“If you dress like a lady you will be treated like a lady. A short skirt or perhaps more a see-through top, may attract unwanted attention.

“I go to nightclubs like other girls my age and when I do I’m always struck by the same thing.

Holly, from Welling, Kent, slammed the 'reckless style' of pop stars such as Rihanna and Miley Cyrus ...
… suggesting they’re excessive nudity encouraged young girls to bare too much flesh

“You walk into a room all the guys are looking at you, just up and down like you’re a piece of meat and I think if girls had longer skirts they would feel more confident and safe.

“I think there is a certain element of responsibility that comes with designing clothes and an element of responsibility when it comes to wearing them.

“I don’t believe anyone under any circumstances anyone should be taken advantage of, however when it comes to clothes young women have to take responsibility for their look if they do not wish to be left in a vulnerable position.”

Favouring the style of Audrey Hepburn and Dita Von Teese, she added: “I think Miley Cyrus in particular who is always in the news for wearing very little just gives the wrong image to young girls.

Winner of this year’s Miss Vintage UK, pretty Holly prides herself on her lady-like attire

“It tells her young fans that being naked means success and she is influencing them to wear very little in the hope of fame and fortune.

“I think Dita Von Teese has got it absolutely right, though she is incredibly sexy and a burlesque dancer she dresses like a lady, she leaves something to the imagination – she looks classic.”

Growing up with her grandparents, Holly would watch endless old movies from the 1940s and 1950s and soon became a big fan of the musical Grease.

But it wasn’t until she joined a musical theatre course when she was 17-years-old she had the confidence to undergo her vintage make over - first purchasing a 1960s crimplene dress in a charity shop. 

Holly wears 'granny style' clothing and has spent more than £2,000 creating her perfect pin up 1950s collection
Holly Foster attending a War and Peace revival event last year

Miss Foster joked that while studying at the University of Norwich, she blew her ‘entire maintenance loan’ at vintage fairs becoming obsessed with cute cardigans, cotton gloves and long circle skirts.

Now she will only wear 'granny style' clothing and has spent more than £2,000 creating her perfect pin up 1950s collection. 

Obsessed with homing the perfect look and collecting precious items, Miss Foster hopes to purchase a Lilli Ann suit which would have been worth up to £3,000 at the time it was made, which she describes as the ‘Ferrari of the vintage world.’

But Miss Foster wasn't always so confident in her appearance, a shy school girl said she struggled to accept her body growing up and blamed feeling awkward in 'ill fitting high street fashion'.  

The blogger, who works in retail, believes if women were encouraged to dress for their shape rather than fashioned on the ‘straight up and down Primark mannequins’ there would less body image issues in teenage girls.

Holly said: “I definitely feel in the recent years we’ve seen more coverage of why its irresponsible for magazines to print stick thin models.

‘It encourages girls to want to try and emulate that kind of figure without considering the consequences – it results in anorexia, girls looking gaunt.

Times have changed: Holly before her vintage makeover
Throw-back: Holly takes inspiration from the style of Audrey Hepburn and Dita Von Teese

“What is really interesting is when you look at vintage magazines the 1950s really embraces all shapes and sizes because young women were told how to dress for their shape.

“Someone like Audrey Hepburn was very slim but it was never about that it was about her fabulous style.”

“Today our fashion magazines, the fashion industry uses tiny models as clothes horses in baggy tops and tight jeans and young girls are left disappointed when they look fat or ill shaped in their clothes.  

“If more girls dressed for their figures, they embraced the fifties outlook on fashion I believe we would have less eating disorders, less girls being so desperate to be skinny. 

“Young people would concentrate on wanting to look nice rather than being as thin as possible. It would be about the clothes and not about the size of them.”

Last August she was crowned Miss Vintage UK for ability to put together ‘the perfect 1950s outfit’ and now models within the Vintage community. 

"I think I love the vintage community because it embraces more than just wardrobe, everyone is very respectful and well mannered. It has old fashioned values which has been lost in our society today." She added. 

"I have friends who dress 'normal' and they accept me for the way I am. They find it funny sometimes but I suppose its each to their own. 

"Men I meet tell me I look attractive because I leave a little something to the imagination and I find older people will often come up to me and say 'I used to wear that'... 

"My mum struggles with it sometimes because I don't dress like her friends daughters she will describe them as my 'granny dresses' but overall my family are supportive of my look."