By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

THE eerie deserts of Namibia look like landscapes from another planet

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The trees are estimated to be approximately 900-years-old

Photographer, David Clapp spent two weeks traveling around the Namibian desert in pursuit of surreal landscapes.

David visited Deadvlei, a white clay pan located near the more famous salt pan of Sossusvlei, inside the Namib-Naukluft National Park in Namibia to collect material for the photographic series on otherworldly locations around Namibia.

Clapp, 45, said: “The concept was to travel the deserts to photograph in golden light and also to shoot the night sky.

The bizarre looking trees have not decomposed due to the dry climate of the Nambian desert

“The concept of night time images in specific was paramount to the trip, as the stars have so much clarity and the Milky Way is incredibly detailed.”

The photographer hopes those looking at the pictures will feel themselves transported to another planet and that it will also inspire others to not just drive through towns but explore them too.

Deadvlei is a well known paradise for photographers with the contract between the dark trees and the bleached-white pans

David, from Exmouth, Devon, amplified the desert trees otherworldly qualities by using a tracking mount and also taking inspiration from his previous work in the Arizona desert, where he also chose to sway away from shooting the deserts naturalistic qualities.

David Clapp spent two weeks traveling around the Namibian desert in pursuit of surreal landscapes

David added: “Some of the travelling between locations took me through some of the most empty and baron places on Earth. I have never been able to look from horizon to horizon across a perfectly flat desert and see absolutely nothing in any direction, not a single focal point.”

Travelling Namiba took David to some of the most remote locations
David had to acquire a specific permit to photograph in Deadvlei during the night

The bizarrely beautiful landscape features the dead camel thorn trees, which first appeared when the Tsauchab River flooded and the abundance of water allowed the trees to grow, according to Sossusvlei.org.

The trees are estimated to be approximately 900 years old but they have not decomposed due to the dry climate of the Nambian desert.

For David there was also a lot of planning that had to go into capturing the stunning milky way night sky images in particular

Deadvlei is a well-trodden paradise for photographers because of the contrast between the dark trees and the bleached-white pans and rusty-red dunes.

David said: “Namibia is a well known country for photography, but it also contains more unusual places that I wanted to explore like lesser known desert places.

David said: “Namibia contains more unusual places that I wanted to explore like lesser known desert places."

"The best work comes when turning your back on well-known subjects and looking for something entirely different.”

For David there was also a lot of planning that had to go into capturing the stunning Milky Way night sky images in particular.

Dead camel thorn trees first formed when the Tsauchab River flooded and the abundance of water allowed the trees to grow

He said: “Daytime would be spent finding out the position of the Milky Way at key locations, to return later to shoot.

“Most days would be spent scouting, then shooting in good light, which would often last just minutes.

The photographer hopes those looking at the pictures will themselves feel transported to another planet

“We would then return back to the desert when either the moon was low enough to provide flattering lighting or when it was gone completely, to give detail to this incredible skies.”

To take a look at more of David’s incredible photography, visit his website: http://www.davidclapp.co.uk/