By Lisa Higgins

DARING tuk tuk drivers swapped weary tourists for polo mallets to battle it out in their vehicles for a £2,000 prize

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The second Lakderana 2016 Tuk Tuk Polo Tournament took place in the Sri Lankan port of Galle

The cabbies took part in the unusual polo tournament braving temperatures of up to 40 degrees celsius in the Sri Lankan port of Galle.

Eight local and international teams competed to win a whopping ₹ 200, 000 prize

Eight local and international teams competed for the grand prize which saw tuk tuks controlled by drivers as players maneuvered polo sticks from the backseat.

The tuk tuks are controlled by local drivers as players maneuver polo sticks from the rear seat

The second Lakderana 2016 Tuk Tuk Polo Tournament was organised by Australian luxury hotelier Geoffrey Dobbs and his niece Rachel at the town’s Marine Walk football field.

Elephants were ridden at six previous tournaments in Galle, but organisers decided to stop using the animals after the 2007 event when one went rogue
Tuk tuk polo rules are similar to horse polo in which three players per team play two seven-minute chukkas of playing time with a 15-minute interval

The game, dubbed Sri Lanka’s hottest new sport, is growing in popularity and has attracted fans from around the world.

Samuel Reynolds from Lancashire heard about the sport while travelling and couldn’t resist a closer look

Freelance photographer Samuel Reynolds, 33, from Preston, Lancashire, heard about the sport while travelling through the country and couldn’t resist a closer look.

Sam said: "“I didn't join in, but there were couple of times when I was right next to the field of play and had to jump out of the way"

He said: “One of my friends in Sri Lanka told me about the competition.
“I didn't join in but there were couple of times when I had to jump out of the way to avoid the oncoming tuk tuks.

The Kalutara Kings pose for photographer Samuel Reynolds before the friendly polo match

“I thought it was really entertaining and give respect to the skill involved.
“It was a friendly, light-hearted affair and despite rigorous cheering the atmosphere was amicable between opposing teams and spectators alike.

There are three players per team and each match consists of two, seven minute chukkas of playing time with a 15-minute interval

“Temperatures regularly top 40C at midday here so respect where it's due to the competitors for taking part in the baking sun.”
Tuk tuk polo rules are similar to horse polo in which three players per team play two seven-minute chukkas of playing time with a 15-minute interval.

No team is allowed more than two tuk-tuks in one half at any given time, only one tuk tuk from each side can enter the goalmouth

No team is allowed more than two tuk tuks in one half at any time and only one tuk tuk from each side can enter the goalmouth.
The sport has also pleased animal rights activists as elephants had been ridden at previous tournaments in Galle, before one stampeded into spectators’ cars in 2007.